Crypto Bets on the US Election Show Joe Biden Winning the Presidency by 60%

Crypto Bets on the US Election Show Joe Biden Winning the Presidency by 60%

During the first half of the year, betting portals that allow people to wager cryptocurrencies on the upcoming U.S. election had shown Donald Trump winning the election. However, after Tuesday evening’s Presidential Debate, betting markets like Cloudbet show Joe Biden’s chances of getting elected is favored by 61% over the incumbent Trump.

Tuesday’s Presidential Debate was considered by many as one of the “worst debates” in the history of American leadership. However, many people still kept score on how each candidate did during the evening’s political discourse.

In addition to all the people watching the debate on television, a great number of people have been betting on the outcome. The betting web portal Cloudbet, a gambling operator that accepts BTC, USDT, BCH, and ETH, detailed that the company saw a “significant pick-up in betting activity ahead of the debate.”

Crypto Bets on the US Election Show Joe Biden Winning the Presidency by 60%
Tuesday evening’s Presidential Debate was considered the “worst” in American history by many political pundits. Scanning wagers on cryptocurrency gambling portals shows a number of bets held on Cloudbet, Betmoose, and FTX Exchange point to Joe Biden winning the U.S. election by over 60%.

Back in February and in June 2020, news.Bitcoin.com reported on gambling websites and prediction markets that said Donald Trump would likely win the election. However, after the Presidential Debate, it seems the tides have changed more broadly in Biden’s favor.

“Cloudbet saw a significant pick-up in betting activity ahead of the debate: About 10% of the value of all bets on the U.S. election was placed in the 24 hours leading up to the event,” a spokesperson for the company said. “Bets on Trump accounted for 90% of the new positions.”

Cloudbet’s spokesperson added:

Odds on a Biden win shortened to 1.65, meaning betting markets give him 61% chance of being elected, according to prices compiled by crypto sportsbook Cloudbet. That compares to 1.73 (58%) just before the debate. Trump’s odds drifted to 2.23 from 2.16.

In addition to Cloudbet, a number of other betting portals are accepting cryptocurrency-fueled bets on who will win the U.S. election this November.

The “Will Donald Trump be elected president in 2020” wager on Betmoose.

Betmoose, another crypto gambling operator, has a few different election bets going. For instance, the Betmoose wager called “Will Donald Trump be elected president in 2020?” has seen 12.93 BTC ($138k) in total volume to-date. So far 6.443 BTC or 74 bets say that Trump will win, while 6.491 BTC or 46 cumulative bets say Biden will win.

Trump’s chances are also lower at the FTX Exchange as well, as the “TRUMP” futures token has slid from $0.62 or a 62% chance of winning to $0.40 today. This means the presidential election futures token bets show that Biden is leading Trump by 60% today.

Another betting exchange taking U.S. election wagers is Fairlay, and one particular staked bet says Trump will win by 91%. Fairlay is one of the only crypto-infused gambling operations that shows Trump winning a number of election stakes, as most crypto betting operators today show Biden leading by 55-65%.

Looking at the prediction markets leveraging Augur shows that there are still two wagers showing that Trump could win the election. However, there’s a new prediction market called “Will Donald Trump be Re-Elected in 2020?” that has $22,221 at stake showing he will lose by 56%.

What do you think about the bitcoin betting portals that show Joe Biden might take the presidency from Donald Trump this election? Let us know what you think in the comments section below.

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Image Credits: Shutterstock, Pixabay, Wiki Commons, Betmoose,

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Judge Rules Kik’s Token Sale Violated US Securities Law

A U.S. judge ruled Wednesday that Kik violated securities law when it raised $100 million via a token sale in 2017.

Judge Alvin Hellerstein, a U.S. district judge for the Southern District of New York, wrote that in his view, Kik’s “token distribution event” (TDE) satisfied the three prongs of the Howey Test, referring to the Supreme Court case used as a standard for determining whether the sale of something is a securities sale. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), which filed the suit against Kik last year, maintained that the messaging platform’s Kin token sale was an unregistered securities offering while Kik claimed it was not.

“Kik concedes that its issuance of Kin through the TDE involved an investment of money by which participants purchased or acquired Ether and exchanged Ether for Kin. Thus, the parties agree that the first element of the Howey test is satisfied,” he said in the 19-page ruling. “The parties dispute whether the second and third elements are satisfied. I hold that that they are.”

Initial coin offerings (ICOs) and token sales have been treated as unregistered securities sales for the most part by the SEC, which has filed suits against numerous startups and companies, including Telegram, another messaging company that raised a mammoth $1.7 billion.

Many of these cases use Howey, which says something might be a security if there is an investment of money in a common enterprise, with the expectation of profit, primarily from the efforts of others.

Judge Hellerstein wrote Wednesday that Kik “extolled Kin’s profit-making potential,” satisfying one of the prongs, and that Kik “pooled proceeds from its sales of Kin in an effort to create an infrastructure for Kin, and thus boost the value of the investment.”

This satisfies another prong, he said.

In a statement, Kik CEO Ted Livingston said he was “disappointed in this ruling,” and that the company is considering its options, including a potential appeal.

“To be clear, Kik has always supported the Commission’s goal of protecting investors, and we take compliance seriously. In preparing for the sale of Kin, Kik retained sophisticated counsel (both in the United States and internationally) to analyze the law as we understood it, and we continue to believe that the public sale of Kin was that of a functional currency and not a sale of securities,” he said.

Livingston added that the ruling would not impact kin.

Kik general counsel Eileen Lyon took aim at the SEC in a statement, saying the agency “should engage in proper rulemaking, including the opportunity for public commentary, rather than force our industry to hunt for regulatory clues among the SEC’s conflicting statements, Commissioner and staff speeches, no-action letters, closed-door meetings with the SEC and nonprecedential settlements.”

The parties have until Oct. 20 to file either a joint proposal for providing relief to Kik’s investors, or a document explaining their positions on how to proceed.

Prospective Node Operators Stake $125M in ETH to Participate in NuCypher Encryption Network

Encryption startup NuCypher has finished distributing its network’s native token, NU, to over 2,000 prospective node operators who staked more than $125 million worth of ether (ETH) during the month of September. NuCypher’s system will hit Ethereum’s mainnet on Oct. 15.

Primarily marketed as a solution for developers building decentralized applications (dapps), NuCypher helps firms encrypt data before they upload it to decentralized storage networks, while also retaining control over who can read the data once its uploaded (using an advanced form of flexible cryptography called proxy re-encryption). 

On the other side, participants who run the network’s nodes earn fees in return for performing cryptographic functions and maintaining the network. To participate, nodes need to stake NuCypher’s token, NU. The company needed a way to distribute NU to entities it might reasonably expect to participate once it goes live, and the solution it came up with was called “WorkLock.”

Under NuCypher’s WorkLock token distribution program, participants looking to run nodes were required to lock in a minimum of 5 ether (worth roughly $2,000 depending on when the ETH was committed). It also requires the staked ETH stay locked for a minimum of six months, starting the day the mainnent launches. The onerous collateral requirement levied on aspirant node operators was meant to dissuade users from claiming NU tokens and not participating in the network.

While participants can choose to stay or leave with their escrowed ETH after the six months pass, if they attempt to withdraw earlier or act maliciously, they would have to forfeit the staked ETH. 

“What it allows you to do is stake or escrow ETH into this WorkLock smart contract. You lock it up for six months from mainnet launch and that grants you this new stake that you can use to operate a new NuCypher node,” co-founder MacLane Wilkison said in an interview.

Last October, NuCypher announced the completion of a  $10.7 million token sale from investors such as Polychain Capital, Bitmain, CoinFund, Arrington XRP Capital, Notation Capital and others.

Wilkinson founded the company alongside Michael Egorov, who also founded the popular automated market maker for stablecoins Curve.

MakerDAO Adds Chainlink, Compound, Loopring as Collateral Options

The MakerDAO community has voted to add support for a trio of new tokens for the decentralized finance (DeFi) loans that generate DAI stablecoins.

Vaults are now open for deposits of Chainlink’s LINK, Loopring’s LRC and Compound’s COMP. Community members pitched proposals to add the tokens this summer and voted for their integration via Maker’s on-chain governance platform this week.

Counting this new crop of collateral options, MakerDAO has added 11 new DAI vault pairs this year. The other tokens, MANA, WBTC, ZRX, KNC, TUSD, PAX, USDC and USDT, were added partly in response to DAI losing its $1 peg, as the extra collateral was meant incentivize collateralizing more DAI to drive its price down.

In a recent bid to rectify DAI’s peg instability during DeFi’s yield farming craze, the Maker community voted in a proposal to lower the collateralization requirements for DAI’s primary USDC vault to pump more DAI into the market. Since the proposal’s implementation, DAI’s price has dropped to $1.01.

Speaking to CoinDesk about proposals to keep DAI’s peg steady, MakerDAO founder Rune Christensen said there is “no other option but to onboard more collateral.”

Currently, USDC is the most popular collateralization option for DAI with 372 million USDC locked. 

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Thirst Traps Explode on NFT Platforms, With Predictably Controversial Results

Sexy selfies and feminist GIFs are selling like hotcakes on non-fungible token (NFT) markets, but not everyone is thrilled about this trend.  

Blockade Games co-founder Marguerite deCourcelle, who sold more than $160,000 worth of NFTs before the NFT craze really kicked off in August 2020, launched a cypherpunk self-portrait NFT in early September and said she intends to explore more “personal tokens” over the next year. 

“I brought in about $20,000 in a month. I haven’t really focused on selling personal NFTs as a part of my business model,” deCourcelle said. 

She marketed the campaign with photos of herself, portraits that clearly required styling and editing skills, which predictably attracted trolls and harassment on social media. Some trolls suggested models can’t be trusted, the infamous temptress trope, comparing deCourcelle to beauty queen Jessica VerSteeg, who is being charged with fraud. But deCourcelle wasn’t deterred. 

“The bitcoiners that see me with a personal token are outraged that I’m … selling a scam with ‘my good looks.’ Most of my supporters and fans enjoy that I’m so front and center,” she said in an interview. “It brings more transparency as I try to be more personable and engaging.”

She said haters suggest she must choose to either be a model/influencer or a developer/designer, as if she couldn’t be both. Like many different types of influencers, crypto influencers often market by modeling, which plays out across social media instead of fashion magazines and runways. 

For example, Rachel “CryptoFinally” Siegel collaborated with a variety of artists using Rarible in September to issue dozens of NFTs inspired by her selfies. Some of her NFTs, such as a lingerie photo titled “I’m in it for the money,” each garnered more than $3,614 worth of ETH. 

Siegel said she hasn’t cashed out any of her earnings yet. Instead, she uses them to mint new NFTs, buy collectibles from other artists and pay for other types of transactions. Many of these pieces are complex images, not simple selfies, all using her general vibe and features. 

“The selfies are representative of new demographics starting to enter [the NFT market],” Siegel said.

Some crypto-savvy women are now using NFTs to profit from their public image, selling to fans who understand they’re basically paying a tribute to the creator in exchange for a blockchain-based receipt. If sex workers can sell bathwater or socks, and podcasters can sell stickers, why can’t crypto influencers sell blockchain receipts? 

In response to the haters, who call these women vain and accuse them of harming the industry, Siegel tweeted: “if my selfies alone have the power to destroy crypto then honestly let it burn boys lmao let it burn.”

Gendered markets

While some women find new conduits for artistic expression in NFT markets, others are dismayed to find their images used by strangers. 

For example, the web developer and painter who goes by Ashtoshi said her bikini selfie was put up for auction via Rarible, without her consent, for over $1,051 worth of crypto. 

Although it may be unlawful for a stranger to profit from her misappropriated image, depending on the source, Ashtoshi herself struggled to get support from the platform to sell her art. She’s one of the critics who thinks selfie NFTs are silly. 

“While, of course, my pictures were posted publicly on my Twitter, to have them taken from my page and then attempt to be sold with promises of ‘writing a person’s name on my boobs,’ etc., is a bit unsettling,” Ashtoshi said in an interview. “It’s unfortunate because I did ask to be verified on Rarible the same day I posted my art – but it never happened.”

Women in the crypto community don’t have a choice whether people will attempt to profit from their sexuality. They only have (limited) legal options to fight it like a cat-and-mouse game. This is a tale as old as time, where predominately male circles demean women profiting from their own image as the artist and owner, rather than the passive muse. As a painter who did not want to sell sexy selfies, Ashtoshi said she was disappointed by this dynamic. 

“I won’t be posting anything else on Rarible or using the platform for anything from here on out,” Ashtoshi said. “While the idea of NFTs is super fascinating, I think there absolutely has to be some type of verification measures put in place to guarantee that what you are purchasing is an authentic piece of art.”

Ironically, a blockchain receipt only proves authenticity if the artist (or trading platform) invests legal resources to defend personal brands. No one suggests male influencers “deserve” to have selfies misappropriated, the way women are slut-shamed for selfies taken from Twitter. Some might say the self-portrait NFT trend is part of a wider push by feminist crypto fans to destigmatize self-soveriengty, especially with regards to the female body. 

Crypto-savvy artists like Kitty Bast, Kamil Juaregui and Caroline Dy blur the lines between evocative portraits and digital collectibles. 

Ashtoshi said she wished she had posted her painting NFTs anonymously, to avoid her debacle. Other artists use anonymity to court controversy, such as the team called ButerinSisters (after Ethereum creator Vitalik Buterin). They made a clitoris GIF NFT for roughly $54, which was traded by several collectors. ButerinSisters said they met other feminists in the space by promoting this NFT, and hope to playfully educate a few men as well. 

“We are feminists and when we discovered the Rarible platform we realized that there were mostly creations made by men and for men, it seemed interesting to us to show feminine creations,” ButerinSisters said in an interview. “We want to use the web 3.0 technology to fight [the patriarchy] and develop feminists representations with decentralized infrastructure, which cannot be censored. … Anatomy is political.”

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What can I do to prevent this in the future?

If you are on a personal connection, like at home, you can run an anti-virus scan on your device to make sure it is not infected with malware.

If you are at an office or shared network, you can ask the network administrator to run a scan across the network looking for misconfigured or infected devices.